TONEWOODS

woods valenti guitars

I personally select the blanks that are going to be in my stock and therefore which will become instruments.

I’ve chosen those species which in my experience give the best results in terms of tonal response, weight, stability, figure and workability: Black Limba, Swamp Ash, Mahogany, for bodies; Flamed Maple, Wenge, Rosewood, Bubinga, Ebony for necks and fretboards; All the most killer looking woods for tops, such as Cocobolo, Figured Ebony, Flamed and Quilted Maple, etc.
I’m happy to use and discuss different species that you have in mind for your instrument, and any suggestion is more than welcome.

By clicking on the list below (you might need to disable Adblock) you’ll find a short description of each species, which is far from being complete and totally exhaustive, but it helps to give you a rough idea on the characteristics of each wood; if you’d like to have more infos, just drop an email.

body valenti guitars

BODY

Black Limba
European Ash
Flamed Maple
Indian Rosewood
Khaya Mahogany
Swamp Ash

top valenti guitars

TOP

Buckeye Burl
Cocobolo
Flamed Maple
Indian Rosewood
Padauk
Flamed Poplar
Figured Ebony
Quilted Maple AAAA+ grade

neck valenti guitars

NECK

Bubinga
Flamed Maple
Indian Rosewood
Khaya Mahogany
Wenge
Laminated

freatboard valenti guitars

FRETBOARD

Bubinga
 Cocobolo
 Ebony (Jet black)
 Flamed Maple
 Indian Rosewood
 Wenge
 Figured Ebony

A QUICK NOTE

Deforestation is a huge problem nowadays, and if we keep going without thinking about it a great amount of species will go extinct within our generation. Cocobolo, Bubinga, all the subspecies of Rosewood, certain types of Mahogany etc. are all in danger. I offer all these amazing tonewoods in my catalogue because I buy them from CITES and Rainforest Alliance certified suppliers; also all the blanks have at least 10 years of drying process, therefore it is not new wood cut.
A special mention goes to Ebony: finding pure black Ebony is becoming a problem, because in Nature there’s only one totally black tree out of twenty, think about all the instruments with an ebony fretboard on them and you’ll see where the problem lies. Because of this I’d rather use Figured Ebony, which is exactly the same as the ”standard” Ebony with the difference that it has some figures in it ( lighter stripes, flames, quilt etc.); I also find it more attractive and intresting than the usual one. I still have a private stock of 35 yrs old black Ebony fretboard blanks if you want it though!